gunpowderandspark:

dapperhatsandfancypants:

theausterevolunteer:

oscarstardis:

stillmonkeys:

From A Series of Unfortunate Events DVD commentary track.

if you haven’t watched this film with the commentary then you are missing out, it’s hilarious. “Lemony Snicket” was completely unhappy with the film and wanted no real part of it and so in the commentary he just fucks about. Seriously, at one point he gets out an accordion and drowns out the director with his playing

"nearly all of my life"

Lemony Snicket sass is what I aspire to in life.

"Lemony Snicket" (Dan Handler) was asked if he liked the movie.
He said “I love the movie as much as someone who wrote 8 drafts of a movie before being fired from his own creation could possibly be.”
The man’s life is sarcasm and it’s beautiful.

gunpowderandspark:

dapperhatsandfancypants:

theausterevolunteer:

oscarstardis:

stillmonkeys:

From A Series of Unfortunate Events DVD commentary track.

if you haven’t watched this film with the commentary then you are missing out, it’s hilarious. “Lemony Snicket” was completely unhappy with the film and wanted no real part of it and so in the commentary he just fucks about. Seriously, at one point he gets out an accordion and drowns out the director with his playing

"nearly all of my life"

Lemony Snicket sass is what I aspire to in life.

"Lemony Snicket" (Dan Handler) was asked if he liked the movie.

He said “I love the movie as much as someone who wrote 8 drafts of a movie before being fired from his own creation could possibly be.”

The man’s life is sarcasm and it’s beautiful.

american-fuckin-horror-story:

i got out of bed at 11:30 to make this

grayblue:

theaudacityofswope:

amber reminded us on twitter that it’s been one year since Chili’s brony-gate. looking up the controversy around it from that time reminds me just how wrong everyone got it.
they were not showing solidarity for bronies. they were not trying to market to bronies. they were not trying to trick them into restaurants for brony marked-up prices (as if that would even be possible to execute, but that was one theory on a brony forum). and they did not take down the tweet due to anti-brony sentiment. in fact, the tweet had nothing to do with the community.
someone, like a social media manager or a content strategist or a meme maven or whatever, said “hey, here’s a wacky trend. let’s get on it so we’ll look cool. we can be like weird twitter.” they did not bother to understand the community or the movement, and even if they had, they did not bother to ask “do we belong in this space?” (never mind that, when the tweet came out, the “hey, get a load of this” novelty around the discovery of bronies was passé).
they took it down because they realized they were fools. 
i am increasingly making recommendations for brands to stay away from bleeding-edge “cool.” two years ago, i wouldn’t have. i would’ve said (did, in fact) “add a human element, be off-brand, play with memes in ways your audience doesn’t expect.” 
climates change, platforms change, audiences change. brands don’t. their tactics might, but they are still here to sell you something. and they are not your friend. 

^ know the niches that align with your brand, and own them. things are decentralizing, and you need to know your own market above and beyond anything else.

grayblue:

theaudacityofswope:

amber reminded us on twitter that it’s been one year since Chili’s brony-gate. looking up the controversy around it from that time reminds me just how wrong everyone got it.

they were not showing solidarity for bronies. they were not trying to market to bronies. they were not trying to trick them into restaurants for brony marked-up prices (as if that would even be possible to execute, but that was one theory on a brony forum). and they did not take down the tweet due to anti-brony sentiment. in fact, the tweet had nothing to do with the community.

someone, like a social media manager or a content strategist or a meme maven or whatever, said “hey, here’s a wacky trend. let’s get on it so we’ll look cool. we can be like weird twitter.” they did not bother to understand the community or the movement, and even if they had, they did not bother to ask “do we belong in this space?” (never mind that, when the tweet came out, the “hey, get a load of this” novelty around the discovery of bronies was passé).

they took it down because they realized they were fools. 

i am increasingly making recommendations for brands to stay away from bleeding-edge “cool.” two years ago, i wouldn’t have. i would’ve said (did, in fact) “add a human element, be off-brand, play with memes in ways your audience doesn’t expect.” 

climates change, platforms change, audiences change. brands don’t. their tactics might, but they are still here to sell you something. and they are not your friend. 

^ know the niches that align with your brand, and own them. things are decentralizing, and you need to know your own market above and beyond anything else.

gravi-teamfalls:

robertryancory:

Gravity Falls; Sock Opera Rough Designs

Sorry for the delay, back from vacation.
Somebody figured out that Bipper in the Reverend outfit was inspired by Robert Mitchum in Night of the Hunter. That’s my favorite movie and a big influence on many artist I know. There are other secrets hidden in the designs though…

Bill pays Dipper a visit- Original special poses and designs by master of nightmares Robert Ryan Cory!

Bipper’s outfit inspired by this dashing gent: 

http://theredlist.com/media/database/settings/cinema/1950-1960/the-night-of-the-hunter/006-the-night-of-the-hunter-theredlist.jpg

mightygladers:

The Maze Runner opens in my country tomorrow and because I live in Singapore, the reviews of the movie here focus not on Thomas or Teresa but on the Asian character Minho and how he is portrayed to be a “strong, positive character” that is “free of stereotyping”. He “speaks without a ching-chong Asian accent, is not the comical foreigner, sinister force, kickboxer or a prop that adds to exoticism”. The cast is also praised to be feel properly multi-racial and multi-cultural.

And that’s what I feel is so important?? I picked up the entertainment segment of today’s newspaper wholly expecting a report on Dylan and his great acting and a bit about Teen Wolf and all but instead this was a pleasant surprise. I’m so glad the media here recognises as what it is. It doesn’t attempt to liken it to The Hunger Games or any other YA dystopian like I’ve seen other interviewers do, but instead focus on the diversity Wes brings to the screen, and how refreshing it is to see a character that feels real, instead of one that was made up by a writer who knew little about the culture, and who was just trying tick checkboxes on what he thought defined an Asian. I’m sick of media portraying my people to be the bad guy, being the weaker one to the supposedly superior white race or even being the comic relief by speaking broken English.

The book was and still is something very special to me and many others, and I’ll always be grateful that Wes has done such a great job of bringing this gem to life. It truly is one of the joys of being a book fan, seeing the whole process of it, from the announcement of the cast to the filming days to the promotional and press tours and movie reviews, and finally seeing it on the big screen :’)